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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
efforts with pakistan. currently the u.k. is the second-largest of the foreign military force in afghanistan. from london, this is just under an hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with permission i would like to make a statement on afghanistan. formerly i said this government has sought to take a more hard hit security based approach to the mission.vernment as i've said, we are not there to build a perfect democracy, still a model society.re yes, we will help with the detablishment of demographicild institutions and yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage democrac development, but we are in afghanistan. we can improve infrastructure, develop education and encourage development the we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to shore our own national security by helping the afghans take control of theirs. that means building up security forces to drive down british combat forces where the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is poignant today on a plot executed by a
from the middle east and afghanistan and pakistan. americans were the new gold standard and we have a generation al-qaida 2.0 and they are the new version of the digital jihadist. >> historically said terrorist are a muslim male and if you don't fit that profile you don't have to worry. in the book you say that is no longer the model. >> that's right. the american sudden al awaki. whether he is e-mailing or bloging or skyping he using technology and the facebook friend from hell. he spreads ideology to. there is a documented case was home grown terrorism since january 2009 every few weeks. >> what is a sign that a parent ought to be worried about their child recruited or sought after by the terrorist? >> common links we see is the american cleric. lookk at the cases in the united states. almost always the fingerprints of this digital jihadist . the young man who drove the car bomb not far from where we are. he was a diseeple . travel to pakistan and got his training. this event in times square was a successful attack. he drove a car in there with what he thought was a viable explosi
pakistan a strong message >> the pakistani relationship is difficult but it must be made to work overtime. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the many that the american taxpayers have committed to give. >> some $800 million? >> yep. >> it's a lot of cash but is it a political move. our next guest called out the pakistani government in 2006 claiming they knew osama bin laden in's location. peter thompson joins me. he's the author of the new book "the wars of afghanistan." good to see you. >> thank you. >> i want to get your thoughts we reported that the half-brother of huh mean karzai in afghanistan has been assassinated. how does that affect the relationships? >> he was assassinated by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
after the entire terrorist infrastructure inside of pakistan. >>dave: are we taking our eye off the ball? all we hear about is al qaeda? panetta and general petraeus saying we close to finishing them off. is that a public perception? >>guest: i'm concerned by the fact they do recite that there is a war on al qaeda and there are other groups like the indian mujaheddin who is in the to be a front for l.e.t. which operates openly in pakistan. a vast array of groups with the same ideology of al qaeda and we have to go after them just as much. >>dave: what role did pakistani play in this and are they our friend or foe? >>guest: the l.e.t. operate a huge infrastructure in magazine stage and bragged they have 200 facilities operating in pakistan and they have charity schools and pakistan does nothing about it. >>dave: and the funding of the military, we have cut off the military funding. is pakistan saying you need to start the money flowing again here? or we will in the help you? >>guest: that is the direction they are moving. i expect a rise in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that mess
.s. raid into pakistan that led to the killing of osama bin laden. you also would do away with, in essence, the c.i.a. why did you oppose the raid and what would you put in the place of it? >> well, the question to me was i was just saying it could be done differently. i mean, all this does was raise questions and i predicted that this would lead to a lot of resentment and think of the chaos in pakistan and the mess that we have. we both bomb them and give them money and people hate their own government because their own government's a puppet of ours. my frustration with bin laden was it took so long. >> woodruff: and the c.i.a., you would.... >> couric: i don't think the c.i.a. should be a military arm of the government dropping bombs secretly. you can't even separate the two. you don't even know who is controlling the bombing of this country now. >> woodruff: a couple questions about your campaign. you have a son who was elected to the united states senate rand paul from the state of kentucky. this is your third try for president. there was some talk he was looking at running for preside
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
the country in vision relations with pakistan, especially along the borders and with concerns about safe-haven? guest: safe havens, unfortunately, it is a fact that now everyone enologist. this is something we have been saying for the last 10 years or so. our president has still insisted on this. unless you are dealing with the safe haven, which is the root cause, no matter when you do in afghanistan. we will not get the objectives that we are both looking for. this is a problem, but the good news is we have had a constructive dialogue with pakistani government and also with other relevant authorities in pakistan to come up with a reconciliation program, something that we can both benefit from, to be an honest partner for the fight. host: for those discussions foster and all by the death of t osama bin laden? guest: even before that, we had started that discussion. now, after the death of bin laden, which was a great success for the afghan people and our partners, that created a unique environment for the reconciliation and everyone should take it very seriously. we should be honest with
states is encouraged by the ongoing talks between nuclear armed rivals india and pakistan and promises to give full support to indian efforts to protect itself from whatever. a triple bombing killed 20 people in mumbai. a spokesman says a the country had been stalling new and efficient centrifuges aimed at speeding up its nuclear enrichment. tehran may be moving toward weapon-grade arms. he did not elaborate on the specifications of the machines bank in london, rupert murdoch has arrived at britain's parliament ahead of his appearance before lawmakers. he will be questioned about the investigation that brought down the newspaper. his son and rebekah brooks are also expected to appear. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> the c-span network -- we provide coverage of politics, public affairs, nonfiction books, and american history. it is all available to you. find our content any time throughout c-span's video library. bringing our resources to your community. is washington, -- it is washington, your way. >> ann coulter has something to say. sunday, august 7, your c
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
about fraud in afghanistan, iraq, pakistan, and now the congress wants us, after giving away our jobs, not fair trade, free trade agreements -- now they want to go back and give them away with korea. i cannot believe the direction that this country has gone in. we keep talking about corporate tax rates. that is the key word. "rate." they are not paying 35%. they are paying 4%, 6%, 9%, and i am making up the difference. the irs is after a relative of mine who lost their job. they owe them $5,000. karzei and his brother have walked off with billions of dollars and our congress cannot seem to stop it. guest: well, there is a lot there. obviously, a lot of these countries, and it is very disappointing to see fraud and hopefully over time it will go down, i do not want to make any excuses for it because there are no excuses for that activity. a lot of these countries do not have the same developed a rule of law that we have over here. even in our country, there have been instances of fraud and bribery and things like that. there were huge problems in its new jersey and in the past. in illi
about fraud in afghanisn, iraq, pakistan, and now the congress wants us, after giving away our jobs, not fair trade, free trade agreements -- now they want to go back and give them away with korea. i cannot believe the direction that this country has gone in. we keep talking about corporate tax rates. that is the key word. "rate." they are notaying 35%. they are paying 4%, 6%, 9 and i am making up the difference. the irs is after a relative of mine who lost their job. they owe them $5,000. karzei and his brother have walked off with billions of dollars and our congress cannot seem to stop it. guest: well, there is a lot there. obviously, a lot of these countries, and it is very disappointing to see fraud and hopefully over time it will go down, i do not want to make any excuses for it because there are no excuses for that activity. a lot of these countries do not have the same developed a rule of law that we have over here. even in our country, there have been instances of fraud and bribery and things like that. there were huge problems in its new jersey and in the past. in illinois
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)